Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Searching for Marriage Records

Searching for Marriage Records


1886

One of the more difficult aspects of looking for ancestors is the discovery of a marriage record at the local court house.  As so many marriages occurred in churches went unrecorded at the court house simply because it was not always required by law.

For this reason, it is incumbant upon the genealogist to do a through search into the activities of those concerned.  Let us say that the search is for the name of the bride.  One must begin, however,  with the groom and trace his whereabouts during certain years.  In other words, find enough information so to draw certain conclusions.   A normal practice was to marry one's neighbor.  This could be in the vicinity of the home of the groom, or in another locale which also included relatives with whom he often visited.

An important resource is a visit to the cemetery is indicated because sometimes the bride's maiden name is also on the tombstone.  While you are there, look around and see who was buried near your families.  This is the local neighborhood; friends and relatives of your ancestors!  If you have performed a thorough search of the deed records (another good source), you will recognize some of these people.

Also, in more recent years, the death certificates of all of the children of a couple is a good bet because the name of the mother could be listed.   And, a death certificate of the husband as well.  Virginia Genealogy





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Friday, August 10, 2018

Carrying Tobacco to Market #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

Carrying Tobacco to Market


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Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Find out if your Virginia Ancestors Left a Will or Estate in Virginia #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy #vawills


Learn if your Ancestors Left a Will in Virginia


Old Colonial Records, Wills, Estates
SAVE TIME!  Visit the link listed below to learn if any of your ancestors left wills or estates in Virginia 

Use this Virginia County Index to Find Ancestors





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Friday, August 3, 2018

Did your Ancestors Hide from the Census-Taker? #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

Did your Ancestors Hide from the Census-Taker?

doorYour ancestors may not have filed their deeds, wills or marriages and avoided the census-taker, however, there exists one county record which he could not avoid. And that was the tax collector. He to declare his land and other property. For this reason, an examination of the tax digest is essential to any genealogical search. It pinpoints the date of residence, number of acres, adjoining properties and waterways. Further, those who did not declare their property, were listed as "defaulters." That could mean that he had died, or moved. This is how tidbits of information such as the tax digest help to establish certain facts which help to continue the research effort. 

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Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Polish Glassmakers #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy #vaancestors #vawills #vamarriages

Polish Glassmakers

glassmakingThe first settlers sent to Virginia by the London Company thought that the abundance of trees necessary to fire pits to make glass was an advantage. During 1608, when a number of tradesmen arrived in the second supply ship, they were accompanied by Dutch and Poles. Their purpose was to make a trial of glass-making. Subsequently, a glass-house was erected about a mile from Jamestown. Capt. Smith supervised the operation and sent a cargo of specimans of glass to England. In 1621, the Virginia Company of London entered into a contract with Captain William Norton who had decided to emigrate with his family. The terms were that he was to carry over with him four Italians skilled in glass-making along with two servants. The expense of transporting six persons was to be borne by Norton.  more ---





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Saturday, July 28, 2018

The Cyclopean Towers of the Alleghany Mountains #virginiapioneersnet

The Cyclopean Towers of the Alleghany Mountains 

Cyclopean Towers

The Cyclopean Towers are also in Solon, Virginia were so called because of their resemblance to the Cyclopean walls of the ancients. They are formed of limestone, and as they stand at the outlet of a valley, through which it is probable a mighty river once flowed, they were evidently formed by the water while forcing its way around 171 the point of the neighboring hill. There are five or six of them, and they vary from forty to ninety feet from base to summit, and are covered with trees. When viewed at the twilight hour they appear like the mouldering ruins of a once magnificent castle, and the wildness of the surrounding scenery is not at all calculated to dissipate this illusion.

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Friday, July 27, 2018

The Oldest Will in Virginia ! #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

The Oldest Will in Virginia

Chuckatuck Parish. St. John's CHurch
Epraphrodibus Lawson, in Tarrascoe Neck Chuckeytuck Parish, Nansemond County. Lawson must have migrated to the Northern Neck. His will was in Lancaster County, in 1652. It is believed to be the oldest recorded will in the United States. The will follows: 

"In the name of God, Amen, I Epraphrodibus Lawson, of Rappahannock, being sick of body, but of perfect memory, Glory be to God, do make this my last will and testament. I make and ordain, ye child of my wife; my heir; my wife; third; March 31st, 1652. Epraphrodibus Lawson."

Witnesses: Elos Lors; Joan Lee; Wm. Harper.
Recorded June, 1652.
G. John Phillips.

Note:This last will and testament has suffered the vissitudes of time, as part of it is torn off. 

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Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Mecklenburg County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages, Probate Records #virginiapioneersnet #vawills #vagenealogy #vaancestors

Mecklenburg County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages, Probate Records



Mecklenburg CountyMecklenburg County was organized on March 1, 1765, having split off from Lunenburg County in 1764 as the result of the passage of an Act by the Virginia General Assembly. The result was that Lunenburg was divided in three counties, Lunenburg, Charlotte and Meklenburg. 

Mecklenburg County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers 

Images of Wills 1765 to 1782 
--Note: These old documents were pasted together and there is some blurring -- 

Anderson, Thomas | Arnoll, James | Arnoll, James (2) | Atkinson, John | Baker, Zachariah | Baskerville, George | Bell, William | Bland, Merit | Bott, Ann | Bugg, Jacob | Bugg, Samuel | Burnett, John | Burton, Hutchins | Burton, Nowel | Burwell, Thacker | Cheatham, Leonard | Clarke, Jesse | Cockerham, Philip | Connell, Robert | Cooper, James | Cox, Bowling | Cradle, Briant | Dortch, Noah | Eastland, Thomas | Fargason, Sarah | Fox, Richard | Griffin, Francis | Greenwood, James | Greenwood, Robert | Greer, Joseph | Harris, William | Hatchell, William | Hester, Abraham | Hill, William | Holloway, James | Holmes, Isaac | Holmes, Samuel | Hudson, Charles | Hudson, Christopher | James, Robert | Jefferson, Field | Jeffries, John Jr. | Johnson, Daniel | Ladd, William | Lambert, James | Lawton, John | Lee, Walter | Lewis, Edward | Lucas, William | Luck, Dennis | Mabry, Anne | Maclin, Thomas | Mason, Ann | Mason, Thomas | Murphey, John | Murray, John | Phillips, Martin | Poole, William | Pughe, John | Ragsdale, Benjamin | Reed, John | Roberts, Alexander | Roberts, John | Rudd, Joseph | Ruffin, John | Ruffin, John (2) | Russell, Richard | Shelton, John | Skelton, William | Smith, Preston | Smith, Robert | Speed, John Jr. | Stewart, Martha | Stovall, Thomas | Stroud, John | Tarry, Samuel | Taylor, Thomas Sr. | Taylor, William | Thomason, James | Thompson, Wells | Tillman, Roger | Townsen, William | Tucker, James Tucker, Mat | Walker, Edward | Watson, James | Whitterman, Abraham | Whittmore, Lewis | Wiles, Robert | Willis, Richard | Wilton, Richard | Wright, Reuben | Young, Richard | 
more names --- >




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See Names of your Ancestors in Lunenburg County Virginia #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

Lunenburg County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Indexes to Probate Records


Lunenburg County

A familiar reference to genealogists is "The Old Free State" and this is because as the War Between the States was approaching reality, Lunenburg County informed the Commonwealth of Virginia that it would break off and join North Carolina if they did not join The Confederacy. Some of the first settlers were: Ziner Gregory, William Taylor, William Ragsdale, William Johnson, William Hood Jr., William Ambrose, Edmund Bacon, George Hatchell, George Clarke, Henry Gill, Green Smithson, Henry Freeman, Edward Jordan, Archibald Hatchell, Bass Fowlke, Baxter Jordan and James Hazlewood. 

Lunenburg County Records available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Images of Wills 1810-1818
Testators: Bagley, Anderson; Barnett, Joel ;Betts, Barbara ;Betts, Riston ;Bohanon, Joseph ;Brown, Robert ;Burnett, Jeremiah ;Cameron, John ;Crafton, Thomas; Edwards, Elzabeth ;Erskins, Alexander ;Gardner, John ;Gee, Benjamin ;Gee, Mary ;Gordon, Elizabeth ;Hazlewood, Daniel Sr. ;Hightower, Nelson ;Jeter, Armstead ;Jones, Peter Sr. ;Jones, Thomas ;Jones, Thomas(2) ;Jordan, Thomas ;Lambert, Jeremiah ;Ragsdale, John ;Saffon, Matthew ;Slaughter, John ;Stone, Richard Sr. ;Tatum, William ;Tomlinson, Benjamin ;Wilkes, Minor ;Williams, William
Digital Images of Wills 1818-1826 
Testators:Abernathy, William; Andrews, George ;Ambrose, William;Bacon, Edmund ;Billups, John ;Blackwell, Robert ;Blackwell, Thomas ;Boswell, John ;Branch, Jones ;Brown, Stephen ;Brown, Thomas H. Burnett, Joel;Cabaniss, Sterling; Carter, Mary Ann; Chambers, Thomas;Chappell, Robert; Clarke, George;Clay, Olive; Craghead, Mildred; Dunn, Billington; Ellis, Thomas; Fowlke, Bass ;Fowlkes, Jennings; Freeman, Henry; Freeman, Thrower ;Gee, Jesse Sr.; Gee, Nowel; Gill, Henry; Gregory, Ziner; Hamlett, Jesse ;Hatchell, Archibald;Hatchell, George;Hatchell, Phebe;Hatchell, William; Hazlewood, James;Herring, Stephen ; Hood, William Jr.; Jackson, Elizabeth;Jefferson, Martha;Jeffriess, Thomas ;Johnson, William; Jordan, Baxter ; Jordan, Edward ;Jordan, Susanna; Knott, Robert; Leonard, William; Lightfoot, Elmira;Masters, Rebecca; Parrott, William ;Phillips, Robert;Potts, Nathan ;Ragsdale, William;Ryland,Thomas;Shellbourne, James;Smith, Elizabeth; Smith, Joseph M.;Smith, Robert;Smithson, Green;Taylor, William; Vaughn, David ;Wilkinson, John;Williams, Agness;Winn, Francis; Winn, John; Winn, John Sr.; Winn, Ossamus;Winn, Priscilla; Winn, Sarah

Marriages

Lunenburg County Marriages 1819 to 1825 found in Will Book 1818-1826

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Index to Wills and Estates 1810-1818
  • Index to Wills and Estates 1818-1826

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Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Hoskins Creek in Tappahannock #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy #vawills #vamarriages


Hoskins Creek in Tappahannock

Hoskins CreekTappahannock, the county seat, is the oldest town in Essex County, Virginia and is situated on the Rappahannock River. An interestint aspect of tracing ancestors is to locate and visit the actual site of old homes and beginnings. As we study the deed records, we can just about pinpoint the old home sites. This is important because it provides a grasp of the history of the area and the people who settled there. Reading the old wills and inventories of the county discloses facits of a shared farm economy which helped to feed the earliest settlers, as well as details of everyday living and possessions. We have Old Essex Co. Wills and Estates !





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Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Those who Gave so Much for Freedom #virginiapioneersnet #vaancestors #vagenealogy #vawills #vaestates


Those Who Gave So Much for Freedom

The Virginia ConventionThe name of Reverend William Johnson of Albemarle County was listed among the signers of a petition to the Virginia Convention asking for Independence from England. The first Virginia Conventions were a series of five self-governing political meetings administering the legislative, executive and judicial functions of government. The House of Burgesses had been dissolved in 1774 by Royal Governor Lord Dunmore, and so the conventions served as a revolutionary provisional government until the Fifth Virginia Convention established a republic for the Commonwealth of Virginia in its Constitution of May 1776. Later, in Bedford County he appeared in Court on April 22, 1782 and proved that he had furnished the Convention with 396 pds. of beef for which he was allowed 10 pds. 5 shillings. After the war, he went to Tennessee where he died.  more - Albemarle Co. VA Ancestors





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Wednesday, July 4, 2018

Our Precious Freedom was Won by our Ancestors #virginiapioneersnet #vawills #vaestates #vagenealogy #vaancestors


Our Precious Freedom was Won by our Ancestors

Old FlagFreedom is a precious heritage won by our Ancestors! But do we really know ourselves? The clues lie within our own DNA. Because, you see, we are a composite of them. The way that we think, our appearance, spiritual beliefs and inclinations, all of this is a DNA assemblage of the puzzle of us. To learn some answers about ourselves we must look into the past. Yes, into the lives of those who brought us to this time and place. Discovering our roots is not only fun, but surprisingly delightful. The lineage doubles every generation (into the past), which makes for an unlimited resource of ancestors who were part of the histories which we study today. For example, it is easy to trace the lineage back to a Revolutionary War Soldier. Gosh! The pension itself is loaded with information about the battles they fought and famous officers they served with. You just don't know how this goes, until you read the pension. Then, there are the Civil War Pensions. Of course, the old wills, estates, deeds, tax digests really open the puzzle to a wonderfully new perspective. The old script used is beautifully executed with a quill and india ink. Some of these documents are simply worth framing! 





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Monday, July 2, 2018

Newgate Prisoners Indentured Themselves as Servants to Settle in Virginia #vagenealogy #vaancestors #vawills #virginiapioneersnet

Newgate Prisoners Indentured Themselves as Servants to Settle in Virginia

Newgate PrisonEnglish residents who were unable to pay their debts usually ended up in prison, with no hope of release. It was the ultimate condemnation for poor people and generally accepted by society. James Edward Oglethorpe (before he colonized Georgia) was an avid supporter of prison reform, especially after an artist friend died in Newgate. The friend was a popular artist who lived large. Oglethorpe struggled to get him released, but the artist was put into a cell with a person having a contageous disease and the artist soon died. However, Oglethorpe made his views known by pushing pamphlets and articles in various London newspapers. Ultimately, prisoners were given the choice of indenturing themselves to American colonists. Peter Coffey was born in Ireland and was apparently one of the prisoners of debt in Newgate Prison given the choice of the prison cell or the opportunity to indenture himself in the colonies. He put himself in bondage to come to America in the ship Forward Galley. The voyage was made in October of 1730 and 18 years later after being released from service, he was granted 220 acres of land on Vaughans Creek.

more...Prince Edward Co. VA Ancestors





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Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Remember the Hounds of Baskerville?

Remember the Hounds of Baskerville?

Village of EardisleyThe Baskerville name certainly existed in England dating from the 11th century when Ralph Baskerville owned Pencelli Castle. Then there was the printer, John Baskerville, who used a transitionaltypeface during the mid-18th century. Of course, there is the Sherlock Holmes mystery, Hounds of Baskerville. It is said of the village of Eardisley located in Herefordshire England (pictured above) that the Baskerville family had a castle. Therefore, the question arises as to whether or not the Baskerville family found its way to America. And the answer is "yes". Norvelle Baskerville, born 1709 probably in Hereford, England, came to Virginia during the early part of the 18th century and settled in Cumberland County, Virginia where he died in January of 1750, leaving a last will and testament. This testament is available to members of Virginia Pioneers in PDF format.   more





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Monday, June 25, 2018

Colonial Dress #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy #vaancestors #vawills #vaestates

Colonial Dress

colonialdressShoe buckles were worn manufactured of brass, steel or silver. The periwig was worn during the latter part of the 17th century. In 1689, William Byrd sent one of his wigs to his London merchant with instructions to have it altered. The covering of heads of men consisted of the monmouth cap, the felt, the beaver or caster and the sraw hat. The neck-cloth was of blue linen, calico dowlas, muslan or the finest holland. The band or falling collar was made either of linen omore...Clarke Co. VA Names of Ancestorsr lace. The material of the coat ranged from broadcloth, camlet, fustian drugget and serve to cotton, kersey, frieze, canvas and buckskin. In 1638 a pair of boots in Accomac were valued at forty pounds of tobacco.






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Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Join the Genealogy History Blog for Great Articles about your Ancestors!


Will you Allow AI to Construct your Genealogy?


Photo credited to Dezeen.com
Imagine yourself instructing your computer to assemble a pedigree chart based on the information you provide. As AI draws upon information across thousands of genealogy platforms and assembles the data, would you trust the results?  If IT had access to all of the world's genealogy records, it would probably deliver a fairly accurate genealogy.  The brick walls and suppositions in our work would be analyzed from a mathematical standpoint. Let us face the fact that math is a true science.  I can imagine that when AT hit the brick walls, that he would provide us with a logical choice of the data. Our decision, then, would culminate from the mathematical prowness of a computer. But what about the tidbits of data stored inside our own brain, a sort of family knowledge?  Aunt May always said that our family came to America from Germany, for one example.  There are countless others couched inside of our own brain, not that of IT.

The fastest computer in the world uses about 40,000 processors with 260 cores each. That is more than 10 million processing cores running in parallel. Although each of these cores has less power than the intel processor on your desktop, the entire machine delivers about the same power as the human brain. Interesting. Nevertheless, that does not mean that AI is ready for big things such as robot control. Far from it.  This massively parallel architecture still presents enormous programming challenges in all of the processes powered together. The growth of the IT industry demands the use of custom microchips, more parallelism, more sophistocated software, and even the possibility of entirely new ways of doing computing.  for more articles, Join the Genealogy History Blog




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Monday, March 12, 2018

Images of Surry County Wills and Estates from 1652 to 1844. See Names. #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Surry County Probate Records

Images of Wills and Estates dating from 1652 to 1844. To view the names please go to Surry County Genealogy Records

Virginia Map

In 1652, Surry County was formed from a portion of James City County in the Royal Colony of Virginia south of the James River. In 1676, a local Jacobean brick house was occupied as a fort or castle during Bacon's famous Rebellion against the Royal Governor, Sir William Berkeley.

Tithables 

Note: All males 16 years and over had to declare themselves annually and the number of males which they brought into the colony (mostly white indentured, but some African-American). 

1652-16721671-1684167916801681168216831684
16851686168716881689169016911694
1695169616971699170017011702

Indexes to Wills and Deeds
  • Wills and Deeds 1652 to 1672
  • Wills and Deeds 1671 to 1684
  • Wills and Deeds 1684 to 1687
  • Wills and Deeds 1687 to 1694
  • Wills and Deeds 1694 to 1709
  • Wills and Deeds 1709 to 1715
  • Deeds 1741 to 1746
  • Deeds 1746 to 1749
Maps
  • Old Map
Marriage Records
  • Marriages to 1699
  • Marriage Index 1768 to 1853
  • Marriage Register 1768 to 1853
  • Marriages 1772 to 1825
Miscellaneous
  • 1704 Quit Rent Rolls

Traced genealogies and family histories of Surry County available to Members !

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County and Probate Records to Help you Find your Virginia Ancestors


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Monday, March 5, 2018

Historical Beginning of William and Mary College #genealogy #history #virginiapioneersnet

Dr. James Blair and William and Mary College

William and MaryA Scotch ecclesiastic by the name of Dr. James Blair, Commissioner of the Established Church and member of the Council whose dream it was to erect a college raised a fairly large sum in promised subscriptions before sailing to England where he collected more. Tillotson, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Stillingfleet, Bishop of Worcester, helped him in this endeavor. Also, the King and Queen inclined a favorable ear, and, though he met with opposition in certain quarters, Blair at last obtained a Charter for the erection of a college in Virginia which would be sustained by taxation. Thus, he sailed to Virginia with the charter in hand and a plan to construct "a seminary of ministers of the gospel where youths may be piously educated in good letters and manners; a certain place of universal study, or perpetual college of divinity, philosophy, languages and other good arts and sciences." Virginians were anxious to educate their sons, therefore, the Assembly of Virginia, for the benefit of the college, taxed raw and tanned hides, dressed buckskin, skins of doe and elk, muskrat and raccoon. The construction of the new seat of learning was begun at Williamsburg. When it was completed and opened to students, it was named William and Mary College. Its name and record shine fair in old Virginia. Colonial worthies in goodly number were educated at William and Mary, as were later revolutionary soldiers and statesmen, and men of name and fame in the United States. Three American Presidents, viz: Jefferson, Monroe, and Tyler were trained there, as well as Marshall, the Chief Justice, four signers of the Declaration of Independence, and many another man of mark. In the year 1704, just over a decade since Dr. Blair had obtained the charter for his College, the erratic and able Governor of Virginia, Francis Nicholson, was recalled. For all that he was a wild talker, he had on the whole done well for Virginia. He was, as far as is known, the first person actually to propose a federation or union of all those English-speaking political divisions, royal provinces, dominions, palatinates, or what not, that had been hewed away from the vast original Virginia. He did what he could to forward the movement for education and the fortunes of the William and Mary College. But he is quoted as having on one occasion informed the body of the people that "the gentlemen imposed upon them." Again, he is said to have remarked of the servant population that they had all been kidnapped and had a lawful action against their masters. "Sir," he stated to President Blair, who would have given him advice from the Bishop of London, "Sir, I know how to govern Virginia and Maryland better than all the bishops in England! If I had not hampered them in Maryland and kept them under, I should never have been able to govern them!" To which Blair had to say, "Sir, if I know anything of Virginia, they are a good-natured, tractable people as any in the world, and you may do anything with them by way of civility, but you will never be able to manage them in that way you speak of, by hampering and keeping them under!" *

* William and Mary College Quarterly, vol. I, p. 66. 

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Monday, February 26, 2018

About the French and Indian War #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet

About the French and Indian War 

Indian AttacksDuring the years that Cromwell and his party were in power in England and after Charles II was restored to the English throne, the colonists cleared the forests, planted fields, traded with the Indians and established their homes in the wilderness of the New World. And the migration continued with settlers in Pennsylvania and Virginia pushing further westward into the valley of Ohio, while the English settlers in New York made their way through the forest towards the Great Lake. However, more than seventy years before Jamestown was settled, a French explorer by the name of Cartier entered the Gulf of St. Lawrence, sailed up the river of the same name, and and took taken possession of the wilderness country in the name of France; afterwards known as the great French stronghold in America. Then, in 1608, a Frenchman by the name of Champlain sailed up the beautiful river St. Lawrence, and was so charmed with the scenery of the country that he began to plant a colony on the site of what is now Quebec. The settlement soon became a city and the capital of the French possessions in America. The French were also the first explorers of the vast interior regions of our country. Their fur traders and trappers kept on good terms with the Indians, and slowly pushed along the shores of the Great Lakes until they had established a chain of trading-posts from the St. Lawrence to Lake Superior. About the time of King Philip's War in New England Father Marquette discovered the upper Mississippi, and floated down this great river nearly as far as the mouth of the Arkansas. However, it was the brave French explorers and fur-trader by the name of La Salle who gave France the right to claim as her own the vast domain of the Mississippi valley. When these sons of the forest found the English encroaching upon their lands and hunting grounds, they resented it. Meanwhile, another concern, the Indian tribes had steadily diminished, and they were unable to cope single-handed with the English. Hence they naturally looked to the French for help, and the French readily induced the Indians to join them against the English and their American descendants. It was a fierce struggle. English and American blood flowed like water before it was ended. The Indians never fought in open field, but always after their own fashion. They trusted to sudden attacks, especially at night, and to rapid raids, doing their savage work suddenly and retreating swiftly into the forest. Lonely families and small settlements suffered most. Like lightning out of the clear sky came the horror of an Indian night attack. The war-whoop waked the midnight sleepers and the glare of burning cabins lighted up the darkness. The massacre of defenseless women and children crimsoned the earth in scores of settlements during these cruel wars. Source: The Story of American History for Elementary Schools by Albert F. Blaisdell (1902). Roanoke Co. VA Genealogy Records

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