Friday, March 22, 2019

Images of Stafford Co. VA Wills, Estates #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Stafford County Genealogy, Wills, Marriages, Probate Records

Ferry Farm

Stafford County is located across the Rappahannock River from the City of Fredericksburg. The county seat is Stafford.

Stafford Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Indexes to Probate Records

  • Index to Stafford Wills (1722-1729)

Miscellaneous Wills, Estates

Clement, Edward (LWT) 1733
Elzey, Margaret, deceased (1730) (Image)
Fudd, Michael (Inventory) ca 1733
Grigsby, Charles, LWT (1740) (image)
Grigsby, John, LWT (1728) (image)
Johnson, Booford, estate, inventory (1740) (image) Mauzy, Peter, orphan (image)

Marriages

  • Marriages to 1699

Images of Wills 1699 to 1709

Testators: Alexander, Robert; Ashton, James, estate; Beath, Peter; Benson, Hugh; Bland, James; Brent, George; Brewton, John; Buckner, Philip; Cornwall, Ann; Enno, George; Farlow, Ann; Fitzhugh, William; Harman, Christopher; Harwood, William; Harvey, John; Jenkins, David; King, William ;Littlejohn, Oliver; Mann, James; Martin, Richard ;Matheny, William ;Pickett, Joyce ;Richardson, William ;Taylor, Edward ;Thomson, William ;Vandagesteel, Giles ;Waller, William ;Williams, Anthony ;Withers, John (Captain) ;Wood, William

Images of Wills 1729 to 1748

Testators: Barrow, Abraham; Bayles, John; Boles, Thomas ; Brent, William ; Burras, Mary ;Butler, James ;Cave, William ;Chadwell, John ;Chalmers, John ;Claiborne, Thomas ;Collinsworth, Mary; Cooke, John ;Cosby, George ;Counts, Joseph ;Craford, John ;Croftrodge, Thomas ;Crowley, George ;Denny, James ;Derrick, Mattox ;Duncan, Thomas ;Ellit, Charles ;Fowke, Chandler ; French, Hugh ; Grant, Ann ; Gregg, Lucy ; Grigsby, John ; Grigsby, Thomas ; Higgerson, John ; Hore, Elias ;Howard, John ; Hurst, John ; Jeffrice, Thomas ; Joanes, John ; Jones, Susan ; Keen, Matthew ; Massey, Dodd ; Masters, Thomas ; Mealy, Daniel ; Mees, Mary ; Ponton, Edward ; Powel, Grace ;Scott, Alexander ;Scott, William ;Seaton, James ;Todd, Richard ;Warner, John ;Waugh, John ;Waugh, Joseph ;Wheeler, John ;Wigginton, William ;Withers, James

Images of Wills 1748 to 1763

Testators: Alexander, Philip ;Allan, George ;Anderson, John S. ;Barbee, Thomas ;Baxter, William ;Bosholl, Edward ;Brent, Charles ;Brout, Hannah ;Brown, John ;Buckner, John ;Burge, Edward ;Carter, William ;Chambers, Daniel ;Chapman, Taylor ;Chinn, Rawleigh ;Clifton, Burdit ;Colclough, Rachel ;Conway, Sarah ;Cook, Fravors ;Dade, Cadwallader ;Dade, Townshend ;Dade, Laughton ;Denaugh, Morrice ;Durrcom, Benjamin; Eaves, Thomas ;Edwards,  . . . more . . .



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Monday, March 18, 2019

Lanterns and Candlestickis #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Lanterns and Candlesticks

lanternsCandles made of fireplace ash and myrtle berries supplied the first light for the first colonial homes in the colonies. Myrtle berries were serviceable because the wax to not get too hot to melt. Lanterns came into style during Colonial days and were a prominent feature of the hallway furnishing. Many of these were gilded and many were painted, and their greatest period of popularity was during the first part of the eighteenth century. About 1750 the first glass lamps came into favor. These were not like those of a later period, being very simple in form, and not particularly graceful. 

In 1782 a Frenchman, named Argand, introduced the lamp which still bears his name. This marked the beginning of the lamp era, and while at first these lamps were so high in price that they could only be afforded by the wealthier classes, later they were produced at a more reasonable figure, when they came into general use. . . . more . . .




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Friday, March 15, 2019

Spotsylvania County VA Wills, Estates #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Spotsylvania County Genealogy, Wills, Indentures, Bonds


Walnut Grove Plantation

Spotsylvania County was named for Alexander Spotswood, Lieutenant Governor of Virginia from 1710 to 1722. It was formed from Essex, King and Queen and King William counties in 1720. 

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Wills, Indentures, Bonds 1722 to 1749
  • Wills, Indentures, Bonds 1722 to 1749 (second index)
  • Wills, Indentures, Bonds 1749 to 1760
Images of Wills 1722 to 1749
  • Allen, Thomas
  • Blake, John
  • Ellis, Robert
  • Goodloe, Henry
  • Grayson, Ambrose
  • Hollady, John
  • Leavil, Edward
  • Martin, John
  • Morris, Thomas
  • Samuel, Anthony
  • Taylor, James
Images of Wills 1749 to 1760
  • Allan, John
  • Allen, Elizabeth
  • Barnes, Thomas
  • Battaley, Mary
  • Bullard, Ambrose
  • Carr, William
  • Carter, Joseph
  • Chew, John
  • Childs, Richard
  • Collins, Joseph
  • Collins, Thomas
  • Fox, John
  • Garton, Uriah
  • Gilbert, John
  • Goodloe, Elizabeth
  • Gordon, John
  • Hawkins, Nicholas
  • Herndon, Edward
  • Hunter, William
  • Lynn, William
  • Mathis, Benjamin
  • Matthews, William
  • Minor, John
  • Minor, William
  • Moor, Robert
  • Musick, George
  • . . . more . . .



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Thursday, March 14, 2019

1918 Anderson Six


1918 Anderson Six
Did you know that about the “Anderson Six” automobile? It was advertised and sold in Atlanta during 1918. Do you imagine yourself taking one of the first rides? There are so many interesting stories to learn about our ancestors. Just as we seem to speed quickly along the avenue of life, embracing new ideas and transitioning through new technology, our ancestors also had a grip on the changing fads. 1916 was the last days of Queen Elizabeth’s staunch Victorian Era, and our relatives stepped up for the changes. You don’t really think that your ancestors were boring old trolls who did little to bring out changes, do you? When tracing, it is always a good idea to read the newspapers of their times and see what was happening. Also, 8 Genealogy Websites features genealogy databases in 7 States! Why not check it out?




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Monday, March 11, 2019

Names of Virginia Ancestors --- > Mecklenburg County #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Mecklenburg County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages, Probate Records



Mecklenburg CountyMecklenburg County was organized on March 1, 1765, having split off from Lunenburg County in 1764 as the result of the passage of an Act by the Virginia General Assembly. The result was that Lunenburg was divided in three counties, Lunenburg, Charlotte and Meklenburg. 

Mecklenburg County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers 

Images of Wills 1765 to 1782 
--Note: These old documents were pasted together and there is some blurring -- 

Anderson, Thomas | Arnoll, James | Arnoll, James (2) | Atkinson, John | Baker, Zachariah | Baskerville, George | Bell, William | Bland, Merit | Bott, Ann | Bugg, Jacob | Bugg, Samuel | Burnett, John | Burton, Hutchins | Burton, Nowel | Burwell, Thacker | Cheatham, Leonard | Clarke, Jesse | Cockerham, Philip | Connell, Robert | Cooper, James | Cox, Bowling | Cradle, Briant | Dortch, Noah | Eastland, Thomas | Fargason, Sarah | Fox, Richard | Griffin, Francis | Greenwood, James | Greenwood, Robert | Greer, Joseph | Harris, William | Hatchell, William | Hester, Abraham | Hill, William | Holloway, James | Holmes, Isaac | Holmes, Samuel | Hudson, Charles | Hudson, Christopher | James, Robert | Jefferson, Field | Jeffries, John Jr. | Johnson, Daniel | Ladd, William | Lambert, James | Lawton, John | Lee, Walter | Lewis, Edward | Lucas, William | Luck, Dennis | Mabry, Anne | Maclin, Thomas | Mason, Ann | Mason, Thomas | Murphey, John | Murray, John | Phillips, Martin | Poole, William | Pughe, John | Ragsdale, Benjamin | Reed, John | Roberts, Alexander | Roberts, John | Rudd, Joseph | Ruffin, John | Ruffin, John (2) | Russell, Richard | Shelton, John | Skelton, William | Smith, Preston | Smith, Robert | Speed, John Jr. | Stewart, Martha | Stovall, Thomas | Stroud, John | Tarry, Samuel | Taylor, Thomas Sr. | Taylor, William | Thomason, James | Thompson, Wells | Tillman, Roger | Townsen, William | Tucker, James Tucker, Mat | Walker, Edward | Watson, James | Whitterman, Abraham | Whittmore, Lewis | Wiles, Robert | Willis, Richard | Wilton, Richard | Wright, Reuben | Young, Richard | 

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Index to Wills 1782-1788
  • Index to Wills 1788-1798
  • Index to Deed Book 5, 1777 to 1778
  • Index to Deed Book 6, 1779 to 1786
  • Index to Deed Book 7, 1786 to 1791
  • Index to Deed Book 8, 1792 to 1795
  • Index to Deed Book 9, 1795 to 1797
  • Index to Deed Book 10, 1798 to 1801
Images of Wills 1782-1788 

Testators: Arnold, John | Ballard, John | Blackbourne, Thomas (first page missing from will book) | Bowen, Hicks | Bressie, Elizabeth | Bugg, Jacob | Burwell, Lewis | Camp, John | Carleton, Thomas Christopher, David | Clark, James | Clemonds, Edmund | Collins, Howell | Culbreath, William | Delony, Henry | Duncan, George | Evans, Thomas | Fox, William | Gregory, William | Hill, William | Hix, Amos | Johnson, James | Jones, Robert | Malone, Drury | Malone, Jones | Marable, Matthew | Marshall, John | Maynard, Nicholas | McNeel, John | Munford, R. | Newton, Henry | Ornsbey, Matt | Parish, John | Parish, Peter | Parish, Samuel | Perkins, David | Puryear, John | Puryear, Seymour | Ramsey, Gilbert | Roffe, William | Sandyland, James | Simpson, Richard | Smith, Drury | Speed, John | Stanback, George | Talley, Abraham | Taylor, Goodwyn | Vaughan, William | Walker, Silvanus | Watson, Isaac  ...more...



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Friday, March 8, 2019

Colonists Manufactured the Necessities #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Colonists Manufactured the Necessities

Spinning WheelWithin the Colonial home stood the great and small wheels for wool and flax, the carding-comb and the moulds for making candles of green myrtle berry wax which were not greasy to touch, nor would melt in the hottest weather. During 1698, the typical inventory of a Virginian household included a feather-bed, one sett Kitterminster curtains, and Vallens bedstead, one pair white linen sheets with two do. pillow biers, 2 Rusha-leather chaires, 5 Rush-bottom chaires, a burning glass, a flesk fork, and 6 Alchemy spoones (alchemy being a mixed metal). In addition to these articles, the list includes a brass skimer and 2 pairs of pot-hooks, and, as its crowning glory, one old silver Dram-cup. No doubt the possessor had sat with his boon companions on many a cold night, by the great chimney, plunging the hot poker into the fire nursing the loggerhead 



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Thursday, March 7, 2019

The Colonial Homestead #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

The Colonial Homestead

Carters GroveTowards the end of the 17th century and the struggles of its earliest colonists,the colonial Virginia homestead began to take shape. The house of the planter was substantial and comfortable. The inventory of such a planter mentions, as belonging to the homestead, "a parlor chamber, chamber over said chamber, chamber over the parlor, nursery, old nursery, room over the Ladyes chamber, Ladyes chamber, entry, store, home house quarter, home house, quarter over the creek, Smiths shopp, Barne, kitchen, Dary, chamber over the old Dary, flemings quarter, Robinsons quarter, Whitakers quarter, Black Wallnut Quarter." The house of the rich in the towns boasted a parlor, but its furnishing were simple. A white floor sprinkled with clean white sand, large tables, and heavy high-backed chairs of solid, dark oak decorated a parlor enough for anybody, says the chronicler of Baltimore. William Fitzhugh directs Mistress Sarah Bland in London (1682) to procure him a suit of tapestry hangings for a room twenty feet long, sixteen feet wide, and nine feet high; and half a dozen chairs suitable. The kitchen was typically separated from the dining-room and generally set off in a separate building, due to fires and odors. The dining-room, with its broad buffet, its well-filled cellarette, its silver plate and its quaint old English furniture. Opening out of the dining-room, between it and the parlor, ran the wide hall, with doors at either end, with carved stairway and panelled walls, often hung with family portraits.



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Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Some Notes on Some Interesting Characters in Virginia #virginiapioneersnet

Georgia Pioneers
Tradition has it that Francis Tennille Sr. was a French Hugenot from Picardy, France. His LWT was probated 1779 in Prince William County and named all of his heirs.  One of his sons served in the Second Georgia Continental Battalion during the Revolutionary War.  More information is found in The Austin Collection, Vol. I, by Jeannette Holland Austin and is available to members of Georgia Pioneers.

Mark Thornton of Cumberland Parish in Lunenburg County, Virginia had many descendants in Georgia.  The old man was born in Virginia and died 1809 in Elbert County, Georgia,  leaving a long legacy of accomplished children. More information is found in The Austin Collection, Vol. I, by Jeannette Holland Austin and is available to members of Georgia Pioneers.

Ole Dan Tucker!
There really was an Ole Dan Tucker from Virginia.  He was the son of Robert Tucker and removed to Wilkes County Georgia where he died in 1803.  10 pages of valuable Tucker information is found in The Austin Collection, Vol. I, by Jeannette Holland Austin and is available to members of Georgia Pioneers.

Note:  Virginia Pioneers is a subsidiary of Georgia Pioneers (8 genealogy websites).



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Tuesday, March 5, 2019

French Hostilities in Virginia (1755) #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet


French Hostilities

Port of SupplyAlexandria became the military port of supply. The French hostilities in the region stirred up the Indians until the government of His Majesty became sufficiently exercised to dispatch an officer of the line, Major General Edward Braddock, two warships in which were stowed a fine arsenal of powder, rifles, and cannon, and two regiments of regulars. Word reached Alexandria in February of the arrival of Braddock in Williamsburg and that he and the Governor were in conference. The first result of this conference was a letter to "Mr. George Washington" written on March 2, 1755, and dispatched in the person of General Braddock's aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Robert Orme, requesting the presence of Mr. Washington. A second decision reached in Williamsburg was one that resounded along the Atlantic seaboard - to call a conference of the colonial governors to consider ways and means of waging the coming campaign against the French. Alexandria was chosen as a meeting place and the day set was April 14, 1755. In the meantime, the English warships Sea Horse and Nightingale under command of Admiral Keppel arrived in Alexandria. Two of His Majesty's regiments disembarked from the sea-grimed ships and the Redcoats in formation marched to the northwest of the town led by Colonel Sir Peter Halket and Colonel Dunbar. After the exchange of several letters, Colonel Washington volunteered to go unpaid with General Braddock on the campaign. All at once the town of Alexandria was overrun with governors. From Williamsburg came Dinwiddie; from Maryland, Governor Sharpe; from Massachusetts, Governor Shirley; from New York, Governor De Lancey; and from Pennsylvania, Governor Morris. Neither dress nor ceremony had yet been curtailed by the drabness of Democracy. Each governor arrived with a retinue of secretaries, attendants, and aides; each by coach, decorated in gilded scrolls and colorful arms, drawn by four to six horses; each governor resplendent in wig and powder, silken hose, coats of brocade, velvet or broadcloth, waistcoats of satin or damask, embroidered and braided, shirts of finest linen, betucked and belaced, and attended by servants in livery as colorful as their masters. The town was crowded, taverns full and private houses were put at the disposal of these visitors. Dinners and balls followed the serious councils of the day, which lasted until eleven or twelve o'clock at night. Redcoats were everywhere. The conference over, pomp and pageantry departed, but not before Mr. Washington and General Braddock had disagreed heartily on the fashion of waging warfare. The . . . more . . .



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The Robert Gilbert Story

The Robert Gilbert Story

The Virginia GazetteEleven advertisements placed in the weekly newspaper for Williamsburg, the Virginia Gazette, from 1768 to 1783, remain the sole evidence of the business venture of Robert Gilbert, boot and shoemaker. His shop was in Williamsburg on Back Street in a house where he formerly resided opposite to Mr. Richard Charlton. The story is one of the hazards faced by most craftsmen in eighteenth-century Williamsburg; debts piling up, excess stock on hand, shortage of capable and reliable help, and a market that dried up when the capital moved to Richmond in 1780. He crafted men and womens wood-heeled shoes, calf skins, sole leather, calimanco and pumps, childrens morocco,etc.
"ROBERT GILBERT, BOOT and SHOEMAKER, &c. HEREBY acquaints the publick that he has opened shop near the Capitol in Williamsburg, where he intends carrying on his business in all its branches, viz. shoe or channel, calf or buckskin boots, jockey do. and splatterdashes, mens plain, stitched, spring, and wood-heeled, shoes and pumps, calf or dogskin; campaign, single, double, or turned channels, slippers, blue or red turkey, cork soles, galloches; womens leather, stuff, silk, and braided shoes and pumps, slippers, cork soles, galloches, and clogs. As he imports the whole of his materials from Great Britain, where punctual payments are required, he proposes supplying Ladies and Gentlemen with any of the above articles on the most reasonable terms, for ready money. Those who please to favour him with their custom may depend on their work being speedily executed, in the genteelest and newest fashions, and in such a manner as he hopes will merit a continuance of their favours. Source: Virginia Gazette, June 30, 1768.
Source: The Leatherworker in Eighteenth-Century Williamsburg Being an Account of the Nature of Leather, & of the Crafts commonly engaged in the Making & Using of it by Thomas K. Ford.



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Friday, March 1, 2019

The Good Ship "Metamora" #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet

The Good Ship "Metamora"

Metamora

The good ship Metamora of Alexandria, John Hunter, builder and owner. He was the founder of the Hunter Shipyard, "the most complete private establishment of the kind in the country."
,. . . more . . .


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Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Old Bellhaven, Virginia #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Bellhaven

Map of Alexandria 1752In March of 1752 a committee reporting to the House of Burgess rejected the proposition from the Town of Alexandria to change the name of that town to Bellhaven. There had been much talk about this, and for long the town at Hunting Creek was the only designation. The town was first built on part of a land patent of the Alexander family, and was named Alexandria. The Alexander family, which was both numerous and important (the head of the clan bearing the title Lord Stirling). Prior to that time, George Washington dated some letters Bellehaven. Within a year, a village had become a town with the market place located exactly in the middle. The first courthouse of frame was built on the east side of lot No. 43, at the intersection of Cameron and Fairfax Streets. South of the Town House on Fairfax stood the jail, stocks, and whipping post for the use of those who failed to keep the law. Directly behind these buildings the market square, or green, occupied all of lot No. 44. Here the town militia drilled, here were held the carnivals, and public gatherings, and here was the larder of Alexandria. To this day the market square caters to the appetites of hungry townsmen. Across Royal Street, facing the square, stood the City Tavern or Coffee House; southward on the same side of the street was the Royal George, after the Revolution called George Tavern. Already substantial wharves and warehouses appeared along the water front, and private houses and stores were beginning to fill the empty lots. In June 1754, the trustees ordered that various lots not built upon be put up at auction and sold to the highest bidder. They were in earnest about this dereliction on the part of purchasers, and seven lots were forfeited at this time. Among those paying such a penalty was the half brother of George Washington, Augustine.  ,. . . more . . .



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Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Images of Old Wills in Louisa County Virginia. See Names #genealogy

Louisa County, Virginia Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages, Court House Records


Ferncliff, Virginia

Louisa County was created in 1742 from Hanover County, Louisa County and was named for Princes Louise of Great Britain, the youngest daughter of King George II and the wife of King Frederick V of Denmark. Patrick Henry was known to have resided in Louisa County for a short time on Roundabout Creek. Thomas Johnson was a representative of Louisa County in the House of Burgesses. Patrick Henry established himself as an eloquent lawyer and won his first election in 1765 and represented Louisa County. 

Louisa County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Marriages
  • Marriages 1757 to 1856
Digital Images of Wills 1745 to 1766
  • Belscher, Patrick
  • Buckner, Philip
  • Clark, Christopher
  • Cosby, John
  • Fleming, Robert
  • Harris, Benjamin
  • Johnson, John
  • Kimbro, William
  • Lea, Francis
  • Mackalester, William
  • Meriwether, Francis
  • Moorman, Elizabeth
  • Sumter, William
  • Terrill, Richard
  • Waddy, Samuel
  • Woodall, James
  • Yancy, Archelaus
Digital Images of Wills 1767 to 1783
  • Anderson, David
  • Anderson, Pouncey
  • Arnett, James
  • Barrett, Charles
  • Belscher, Judy
  • Bibb, Benjamin Sr.
  • Bourn, William
  • Bunch, Samuel
  • Byars, John
  • Carr, John
  • Carr, John (2)
  • Carr, Samuel
  • Christmass, John
  • Chiles, John
  • Clark, Francis
  • Clark, Joseph
  • Cory, Edward
  • Cosby, David
  • Davis, John
  • Dickenson, Charles
  • East, Joseph
  • Fernham, Robert
  • Garland, Nathaniel
  • Garrett, William
  • Gooch, William
... more ....


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Friday, February 22, 2019

Powhatan was the Sachem of Eight Tribes #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Powhatan was the Sachem of Eight Tribes

PowhatanSachem means "Chief" The Powhatan confederacy consisted of a number of settlements mostly situated on the banks of the James, Elizabeth, Nansemond, York and Chickahominy rivers, all of which abounded with fish and fowl. Also, the forest was filled with deer and wild turkey, while the toothsome oyster was found in great abundance on the shores of the Chesapeake and its numerous inlets. In his younger days Powhatan had been a great warrior and subdued twenty-two others, so that at this time he was the mighty "werowance", or sagamore, of thirty of the forty tribes of Virginia. The hereditary chiefs of the Powhatan confederacy were permitted to rule their own people the same as they had before they were conquered and their local laws and customs were not interferred with on condition of their paying annual tribute to Powhatan of "skins, beads, copper, pearl, deere, turkeys, wild beasts and corn. What he commandeth they dare not disobey in the least thing." Moreover, as if to make the resemblance more remarkable, his subjects regarded him as half man and half god. Powhatan was described as a "tall, well-proportioned man with a sower look, his head somewhat gray, his beard so thin that it seemed none at all, his age nearly sixty, of a very able and hardy body to endure any labor." And considering the extent of his conquests and unlimited power over his subjects as well as the pomp which he maintained, Powhatan possessed a savage dignity. It is said that he had twenty sons and eleven daughters living at the time of the Jamestown settlement. Nothing is known of his sons except Nantaquans, who is described as "the most manliest, comliest and boldest spirit, ever seen in a savage." Pocahontas, the favorite daughter of Powhatan,is thought to have been born in 1594, which would make her about thirteen years of age at the time Captain Smith was dragged before her august father. The family of Powhatan was numerous and influential. Besides his sons and daughters there were also three brothers younger than himself; and upon them successively (and not his . . . more . . .



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Images of Southampton County VA Wills, Estates #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Southampton County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages

Southampton County

Southampton County was created in 1749 from Isle of Wight County, and part of Nansemond County was added later. During the 17th century, shortly after establishment of Jamestown in 1607, English settlers explored and began settling the areas along Hampton Roads. Most of Southampton County was originally part of Warroquyoake Shire, later called a county. In 1637 the Warrosquyoake Shire was renamed Isle of Wight County. It was in 1749 that the portion of Isle of Wight County west of Blackwater River became Southampton County. The first courthouse was built on the eastern bank of the east bank of the Nottoway River in 1752. The current courthouse building was built in 1834 and is the latest of several which have served the county. Southampton County is the origin of many families of southern Virginia and northern North Carolina. 

Southampton County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to Members of Virginia Pioneers

Marriages
    Marriages (taken from Gates County, North Carolina Bonds)
Miscellaneous
  • William Clegg estate dated 1780
  • Joseph Mackey, LWT 1779 (transcription)
  • Apprenticeship Indentures 1827 to 1894
  • Western Branch Meeting of Quakers
Images of Wills, Book No. 1, 1749 to 1762

Testators:Arrington, John; Arrington, John; Barham, Robert; Barns, Edward ;Barrett, Edward; Bittle, John; Blunt, Benjamin; Blunt, Henry; Booth, Robert; Bowen, John; Bowen, John; Braddy, Margaret; Bradshaw, Joseph; Branch, Elizabeth; Briant, Lewis; Bryant, Mary; Bryan, Robert;Charles, Rebecca; Clark, Thomas; Cob, William; Cobb, Nicholas; Cooper, William;Crocker, Elisha; Crocker, Moses; Crocker, Robert; Crumpler, William; Davis, John; Davis, Martha; Davis, Nathaniel; Dawson, John; Delk, Joseph ;Denson, John; Doyle, Edward; Drake, John; Drake, Richard; Drake, Thomas; Drew, Edward; Dunkley, Catherine ; Dunkley, John; Edmunds, Jeremiah; Edwards, Benjamin; Edwards, Elizabeth; Edwards, John; Edwards, William; Emelly, Giles; Evans, Elizabeth ;Evret, Simon; Exum, Francis;Exum, William; Fort, John;Gilliam, Walter ;Griffin, Mary ;Griffin, Matthew; Gurley, Nicholas; Harris, Martin; Hatfield, William; Hickman, William;Hollaman, Thomas;Ingraham, William ;Jarrel, John; Jarrell, Thomas ;Johnson, Benjamin; Johnson, John ; Johnson, Richard ;Jones, John; Jones, William; Joyner, Brigman; Joyner, Hennaretta; Joyner, John;Joyner, Jonathan; Joyner, Joseph; Joyner, William;Kindred, Mary; Kirby, Moody ;Kirby, Richard ;Lewis, Joshua; Love, Elias; Mackey, Daniel; Manning, Samuel; Matthews, Hugh; Matthews, John; Morgan, William; Mounger, Robert; 
. . .more names . . .



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Thursday, February 21, 2019

The First Public Voice was a Scottish Fellow #virginiagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

The First Public Voice was a Scottish Fellow

Map of UlsterGeorge Bancroft, known for his New England predictions, said: "We shall find the first voice publicly raised in America to dissolve all connection with Great Britain, came not from the Puritans of New England, or the Dutch of New York, or the planters of Virginia, but from Scotch-Irish Presbyterians." It was Patrick Henry, a Scot, who kindled the popular flame for independence. The foremost was descended from those Scots driven out of Ulster by bishops and Lord Donegal & Company. The distinguished place which men of Scottish or of Ulster origin had asserted for themselves in the councils of the Colonies was not lost when the Colonies became independent States. Among the first of the thirteen original States two-thirds were of either Scottish or Ulster-Scottish origin. Of the men who have filled the great office of President of the United States, eleven out of the whole twenty-five come under the same category. About half the Secretaries of the Treasury of the Government of the United States have been of Scottish descent, and nearly a third of the Secretaries of State.  . . . more . . .




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Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Preserve the Old Traditions and Values

Preserve the Old Traditions and Values 

Working to Preserve History
While genealogists work to preserve their family histories and relate the interesting tales to their children and grandchildren, there is a disruption of traditions and beliefs encircling the globe. Every generation has treasured its ways, from the way we speak, walk, dress and act, to or spiritual beliefs.  And yet there has been no American tradition so valued as our personal freedom, and the right to worship our God.  This generation has gone awry with its preference for the re-written history of the conduct and actions of our ancestors.  Yet, somewhere back in time, in the past of the disruptor's, lies some very startling facts concerning themselves and their ancestors.

If they traced back several generations of their lineage and found some brave patriots who loved freedom and the right to worship so much they they gave their lives and fortunes for it, perhaps a greater appreciation of former generations would awaken them from the deep sleep of ignorance and stupidity. 

Perhaps it is up to the old folks to restore peace, love and appreciation for those who came before us by writing more articles and telling more stories on the Internet of how the ancestors sacrificed everything for their posterity!  Then, while the disruptor's are wasting their youth spouting anger, marching in parades, littering our streets, vandalizing homes and stores, etc., we will be writing the history of today, of how much we still care for our traditions and values.  




Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

Online Genealogy

Sunday, February 17, 2019

How do you know if your Ancestor was a Historical Figure?


How do you know if your Ancestor was a Historical Figure?

How do you know until you dig into the past? There are tons of records which embrace the era of our ancestors. The reason they did not all make the history books is because we did not do our home work and write about them. Some of these guys served with General George Washington, Colonel Richard Lee, Generals Greene and Marion. The old pensions describe their adventures. And the further back we trace, there is oh so much more! Most Americans are descendants of King Edward I of England (1300s). And that links us to hundreds of noblemen and heroes.   . . . more . . .



Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

Online Genealogy

Friday, February 15, 2019

Images of Rockingham County VA Wills, Estates #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Rockingham County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Tax Digests



Massanutten Mountain

Rockingham County was established in 1778 from Augusta County. Harrisonburg was named as the county seat. The county is named for Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham, a British statesman (1730-1782). He was Prime Minister of Great Britain twice, and a keen supporter of constitutional rights for the colonists. During his first term, repealed the Stamp Act of 1765, reducing the tax burden on the colonies. Appointed again in 1782, upon taking office, he backed the claim for the independence of the Thirteen Colonies, initiating an end to British involvement in the American Revolutionary War. However, he died after only 14 weeks in office. Rockingham County is the birthplace of Thomas Lincoln, the father of Abraham Lincoln. 

Rockingham County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Miscellaneous

Cabell, Joseph, LWT (transcript) 

Tax Records

1857-1863; 1865 Tax Digests 

Digital images of Wills 1803 to 1806
Testators: Baker, Michael | Bright, Peter | Davis, Robert | Eben, Andrew | Eversole, Jacob | Fuls, John | Fulton, Elizabeth | Harrison, Hanna | Harrison, John | Helfrey, John | Henton, John | Hord, James | Houer, Christopher | Kite, William | Kool, Philip | Lagman, Michael | Lard, James | Lipe, Peter | Mefferd, Garper | Moore, Reuben | Pence, Catherine | Rode, Anthony | Speers, George | Tuteweler, Leonard | Williamson, Thomas | Wilmer, Jacob 



Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

Online Genealogy

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Is the Computer an Answer to Genealogy?

 When the Computer is Not the Answer to Genealogy

The modern age of technology is wonderful!  However, we must not rely upon genealogy programs to find the ancestors. Everyone knows that tracing the family roots is a tedious process involving many long years of hard work. To the new researchers out there: one cannot just sign up somewhere and expect to find the family tree.  Should you think that this is the case, the work itself is riddled with errors.  For this reason connecting to a World Tree is not advisable. One must keep their errors to themselves, not share them!  That is, until they are resolved with factual evidence.  Otherwise, in the end, that World Tree will be a trash dump no one wants to tackle.  Already the term "junk genealogy" has emerged and cleanup is near impossible. The computer programs of today merging data are not cutting it.  Hence, human beings must continue to control genealogical research and maintain it privately on a simple computer program.



Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

Online Genealogy