Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Special Virginia Collections #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Special Collections: Immigrants to Virginia

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin Genealogy Books by Jeannette Holland Austin

The first settlers to Jamestown were instigated at the instance of Captain John Smith. Apparently, this group of immigrants were vagrants brought in off the street of London and includes adults, boys and girls. Vagrancy is noted and what street or parish they were found in. In some cases the church-wardens brought them in for confinement. The vagrants include adults, boys and girls. The 1619 list includes notes from Capt. John Smith, such as "died" and the occupation. The first settlements into the Virginia colony were fraught with hardship. By 1619, it appears that over half of those sent were dead. The Indian massacre did not occur until 1620 or 1621, however, the Powhatan tribe was unfriendly and the settlers had to defend themselves against attacks. This meant that they could not leave the fort during such attacks and apparently died of hardship and starvation. To see these lists, you must become a member of Virginia Pioneers
  • The Virginia Company of London 1606 to 1624
  • First Settlers to Jamestown in 1607 as noted by Captain John Smith.
  • Immigrants sent from London to Virginia in 1618.
  • Immigrants sent from London to Virginia in 1619.
  • Immigrants sent from London to Virginia in 1620.
  • Immigrants sent from London to Virginia in 1622. 1684 English Merchants residing in Virginia
  • Passinger List of ship Charming Molly to Essex County 1765
  • Immigrants to Middlesex County 1674 to 1702
  • Miscellaneous Immigrants from Virginia Executive Papers
  • Deaths of Members Listed in the Journal of the House of Burgesses 1702 to 1761
Sources: Minutes of the Court of Governors of Bridewell. Microfilm at Bethlem Royal Hospital, monks Orchard Road, Beckenham, Kent BR3 3BX, England. Originals at King Edward's School, Witley, Surrey, England and Records of the Virginia Company of London, ed. Susan M. Kingsbury, published for the Library of Congress, 1906-1935; Journal of the Virginia House of Burgesses. 



Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

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Monday, April 22, 2019

The Irish Fore Bearers of George Washington #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

The Irish Fore Bearers of George Washington, viz: Ball, Washington, De Wessyngtons

A large number of Irish were in the Continental Congress or prominent as leaders in every station of life. George Washington was possibly descended on the side of his father from a Washington who had lived in Ireland, and the side of his mother, the Balls, who came from the neighborhood of Dublin. Country Families of the United Kingdom by Walford shows that in the modern age the only families with any property bearing the name of Ball, are to be found in Ireland. The family came to Ireland in the 14th century as Flemish emigrants. It is also claimed that the De Wessyngtons were Flemish who settled about the same time in both England and Ireland. But the head of the English family died some years before the planting of Jamestown, Virginia. The members of the Irish branch have all been traced and some of them to this country. One, a son of Henry Washington, a person of some prominence, disappeared from Ireland during the troubles and probably escaped to Bermuda, where many vessels first stopped on their way to the American colonies.



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Friday, April 19, 2019

Images of Pulaski County VA Wills, Estates #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Pulaski County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Indexes to Probate Records

Dublin Virginia
Pulaski County was formed March 30, 1839 from parts of the counties of Montgomery and Wythe. It was named after Count Casimir Pulaski, an exiled polish nobleman who fought during the American Revolution as part of the army of George. He joined the army in 1777 and became a brigadier general and chief of cavalry in the Continental Army. On October 11, 1779 Count Pulaski was fatally wounded in Savannah and died on October 11, 1779, and his fame is that of being an honored American hero.

Records available to member of Virginia Pioneers

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Index to Wills 1859 to 1871
  • Index to Wills 1848 to 1902 | Images of Wills 1848 to 1902
Images of Wills, Guardianships, Inventories, Estates 1840 to 1859

Abraham, Martha | Adair, James | A. | Allison, James | | Baithwaite, guardians | Barger, Franklin | Baskerville, George | Baskerville, John B. | Baskerville, Spencer | Beard, George W. | Bell, Peyton | Bell, William | A. | Belles, John | Bently, Henry | Black, Hugh | Black, John | Burkholder, William | | Caddall, John | Calfee, William | | Carnahan, John | Clark, Elizabeth | Cloyd, David | Cloyd, Thomas | Cook, Henry | Crawford, John | Danfer, John | Davis, Meredith | Davis, Sarah | Dill, Peter, Mrs. | Draper, Margaret | Eaton, Crozier | Eversole, Phillip | Farmer, Martha | Fugate, Jesse | Galbreath, Catharine | Gesse, William | Gifford, Harman | Glendy, John | Grass, Elizabeth | Guthrie, Elizabeth | Guthrie, Richard | Hager, John | Hoge, Elizabeth | Hoge, J. M. | Howard, Alexander | Hurst, John | Jordan, Michael | Kelly, John | Kent, David F. | King, James | Lasley, William | Mannis, Richard | McGlendy, Polly | Mennahan, Martha | Meredith, Jeremiah | Miller, James | Miller, William | Morris, Mary | Morris, Robert | Muirhead, Andrew | Patton, Henry | Peck, Joseph | Peirce, James | Pittman, Henry | Pryor, John | Raines, Richard | Rankin, James | Rankin, Mary | Safford, Adam | Sanger, Joseph | Sayers, James |   . . . more . . .



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Monday, April 15, 2019

An American Colonist Goes Loyal and Testifies in England #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

An American Colonist Goes Loyalist and Testifies in England

Joseph GallowayJoseph Galloway, a native of Maryland, but long a resident of Pennsylvania before the Revolution, was an early and active sympathizer in the American cause until the Declaration of Independence, when he became a Loyalist. During a visit to England he was examined before an investigating committee of the House of Commons in June of 1779, and his testimony has been frequently published. When asked as to the composition of the Rebel army, his answer was "The names and places of their nativity being taken down I can answer the question with precision; there were scarcely one fourth natives of America; about one half Irish; the other fourth were English and Scotch." Thus, a fourth part was composed of some English, very few Scotch, and more Germans, or Dutch from Pennsylvania and the valley of Virginia, who formed the brigade under the command of Muhlenberg, and the Eighth Virginia regiment. The testimony of Galloway referred to his experience while superintendent of the police in Philadelphia during the British occupancy. "Do you know anything of the army of the Rebels in general, how that is composed; of what country people?" His answer was, "I judge of that by the deserters that came over." It has been estimated that about one fourth of all the American officers were Irish by birth or descent and a large number of Irish were in the Continental Congress or prominent as leaders in every station of life. It is also believed that General George Washington was descended on both sides from Irish forebearers. 



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Friday, April 12, 2019

Images of Rappahannock County VA Wills, Estates #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Rappahannock County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages, Indexes to Probate Records


Rappahannock County Court House
Rappahannock County was first founded in 1656 from part of Lancaster County. Many of the first colonists resided in the area and records exist back to the sixteen hundredths. This old county became extinct in 1692 when it was separated to form Essex and Richmnd Counties. In 1833, the Virginia General Assembly created the currently existing Rappahannock County, taking land from Culpeper County. It was named after the old Rappahannock River which separates it from Fauquier County. The county seat is Washington, Virginia.

Historical Tidbits: In 1669 Thomas Butler of Rappahannock County bound himself to deliver to George Brown, the captain of the Elizabeth of London, three hogsheads of sweet-scented tobacco belonging to the choicest portion of his crop. Brown was to carry this tobacco to England and there to dispose of it for money sterling. After having laid aside twenty-two pounds for his own use, the amount of a claim which he held against Butler for goods previously sold to him, Brown was to employ whatever remained in buying linen and woollen cloths, shoes and stockings to be conveyed to Butler in Virginia.

Sources: Records of Rappahannock County, original vol. 1668-1672, p. 291.

Rappahannock County Wills, Estates, Marriages available (wills, estates, etc.) to members of 
Virginia Pioneers 

(Old, Former County) Rappahannock County Records:
  • Marriages to 1699
Miscellaneous Wills
  • Butler, John Kenny, William
  • Musgrave, Michael, LWT transcript
  • Rowzie, Edward
  • Toone, James (1677), LWT, transcript
Indexes to Old Rappahannock County Probate Records
  • Deeds, Wills, Settlements 1656-1664; 1662 to 1672; 1662 to 1668; 1663 to 1682
Rappahannock County Records

Indexes to Rappahannock Wills and Estates
  • Index to Rappahannock County Wills and Estates, Book A, 1833-1842
  • Index to Rappahannock County Wills and Estates, Book B, 1842-1849
  • Index to Rappahannock County Wills and Estates, Book C, 1849-1855
  • Index to Rappahannock County Wills and Estates, Book D, 1855-1866
Digital Images of (current) Rappahannock County Wills and Estates
    Wills and Estates, Book A, 1833-1842

    Testators: Adams, Easter; Amiss, Philip; Barnes, Leonard; Best, Enos; Bragg, Thomas; Broaddus, Mary; Burgess, Dawson; Butler, Charles; Butler, Elizabeth; Cannon, Reuben; Carders, George; Carn, John; Cheek, Mary; Cheek, Nancy; Conner, Margaret; Daniel, Nancy; Deatherage, George; Dodson, William; Duncan, Frederick; Duncan, George; Eastham, Bird; Farrow, William; Foley, Thomas; Fristoe, Catherine; Gan, William; Gibson, Mary; Gibson, Moses; Gray, Richard; Griffin, Thomas; Grigsby, S.; Hawkins, Nancy; 
. . . more . . .


Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

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Monday, April 8, 2019

Irish Refugee, John Daly Burk #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Irish Refugee, John Daly Burk, Friend of Thomas Jefferson and John Randolph

Trinity College in Dublin IrelandJohn Daly Burk, of Petersburg, Virginia was born in Ireland, and educated at Trinity college in Dublin. Because of his political opinions and affiliations he was compelled to leave the country (1797) while yet a student at college. He first tried his fortune in Boston, and after wards in New York. But he received no encouragement. His love for Ireland and his ardent democracy made against his success at the North, and he finally came to Virginia. Here he became the friend of Jefferson and John Randolph, both of whom encouraged the brilliant young refugee. He was a lawyer, poet, dramatist and historian, and was undoubtedly one of the most accomplished men in the state during his day. He was the author of the History of Virginia in four volumes; A History of the Late War in Ireland. Before he completed the fourth volume of the History of Virginia he was killed in a duel with a French gentleman at Campbell Bridge in Chesterfield county, Virginia, on the 11th of April, 1808. Source: Some Irish Settlers in Virginia by Hon. Joseph T. Lawless, Richmond, Virginia.



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Friday, April 5, 2019

Images of Richmond Co. VA Wills, Estates #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet


Richmond County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Court House Records




Richmond County, Virginia was formed in 1692 out of Old Rappahannock County. Its county seat is Warsaw. The county is located on the Northern Neck (not to be confused with Richmond, the city). The county seat is Warsaw, Virginia. It is the historical site of many first colonists and this fact is reflected in the last wills and testaments. The document was very important for our days beccause it reveals so much about the decedent, which is welcome information to the genealogist. The will is a "must" document to search. In fact, the first thing which you do when you go to court house records is to search the probate records. This is where all of the information resides. True, there are many books written abstracting county wills for the State of Virginia, however, the abstracts simply do not contain the " juice; necessary to dig deep into the lives of your families. The colonial wills, particularly, reveal just about everything, from the location of the homeplace, the burial grounds for the family, the church or religion, and an express division of land, plantations, personal notes, and a vast inventory of all of the items of the estates. After all, every Virginian was in business for himself and contributed a great deal to the community. The estate records provide names of friends, neighbors, distant relatives, names of heirs in English estates, and much much more. A family tree is incomplete without the actual last wills and testaments of all of your family members. The digitized documents on Virginia Pioneers are actual copies from the county clerk. Originals no longer exist, however, the clerk copies each and every will and all of its detail into the county will book. 

Digital Images of Richmond County Wills 1717 to 1725 
Names of Testators: Alderson, John; Jr. ; Armistead, Francis ; Armstrong, John;; Baker, Bartholomew; Barber, William; ; Barrow, Edward; Baylis, Robert; Birket, John; Bonagh, William; Bradley, Elizabeth; Brown, William; Bryan, Elleanor ; Bryan, Thomas Sr.; Burditt, Henry ; Carny, Patrick ; Carpenter, Mary ; Clarke, Thomas ; colston, William; Connell, Michael ; Cous, John; Cushyon, James; Davis, John; Davis, Matthew ; Dodson, Anne ; Fitzhugh, Thomas ; Fowler, Richard; Glew, John; Gower, Stanley; Green, George; Griffin, William; Hall, Elizabeth; Hamon, Job; Hansford, John; Harrison, Robert; Hartley, James; Harvey, Charles; Hatcher, Silvester ; Hill, Richard; Hinds, Richard; Hodskins, William; Hopkins, George; Ingo, James; Jones, Bookes ; Jones, John; Kappax, Peter ; Lawson, Joshua ; Leagar, Henry ; Lune, Mark; Lune, Patrick ; Mathews, Samuel ; Miller, Simon ; Neal, Charles; Norton, John; Pannell, Thomas; Pound, John; Rannell, Henry ; Reed, Thomas ; Reonalds, John; Ritchason, Thomas ; Scurlock, John; Smith, John; Smith, William; Snead, Charles ; Tiller, William; Toone, James; Walton, Cathron; Wells, Elizabeth; Whittle, Thomas ; Wood, Richard; Wools, Hedley
Digital Images of Wills 1788 to 1794 
Testators: Alderson, William; Ball, William;son; Barrick, Elizabeth; Bragg, Moore ; Brannon, James; Brown, Ellen ; Brown, Thomas Sr. ; Buice, William; Bulger, Jane ; Carpenter, John; Cole, John; Corrie, Hannah ; Crask, James; Crask, Sarah; Dale, Joseph ; Dobyn, Edward ; Dobyns, Thomas ; Dobyns, William Forester ; Downman, Francis ; Downman, William; Efford, Zachariah ;  . . . more . . .


Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

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Monday, April 1, 2019

Finding Yesterday with Topographical Maps


Finding Yesterday with Topographical Maps

Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin 

Books by Jeannette Holland AustinAs the countryside gets scraped off, built upon and altered in so many different ways, we lose sight of its appearance in yester years. For this reason, topographical maps are useful in locating old cemeteries, wells, homesteads, railroads and the like. So what is a topographical map? It is a modern charting of the terrain in any given area, characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief and reveals both natural and man-made features. I have used these maps while searching for old home steads and cemeteries. They are quite definitive in locating details such as old farm paths and roads, and the sites where buildings or houses once stood. An excellent finding aid is the descriptions of land lots, creeks, rivers, etc. found in the deeds of the ancestors. Remembering that lakes and rivers were used for navigation, the location of old river beds, rotting dock posts protruding out of the soil and other visuals of a wharf may be central to understanding the positioning of the home stead and its out buildings. Also, the thick weeds in old fields may reveal evidence of plowed rows crops, sunken wells, out-houses, etc., all of which helps to define the period during which our ancestors lived. One never knows what he is to find, until he looks!



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Friday, March 29, 2019

Images of Tazewell County VA Wills, Estates; Marriage Bonds #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Tazewell County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriage Bonds, Probate Records


Tazewell County

During 1771, Thomas and John Witten established the first permanent settlement at Crab Orchard. Tazewell County, Virginia was created in 1799 and was taken from portions of Wythe and Russell Counties. The county seat is Tazewell. 

Marriage Bonds
  • 1801 to 1845
  • 1845 to 1853
Images of Wills and Estates 1800 to 1832 

Asberry, George | Asberry, Henry | Asbury, Moses | Asberry, Poly | Baily, Eli | Barns, Robert | Belcher, Isham | Belches, James | Belches, Joseph | Belsches, Robert | Boston, Isaac | Bowen, Rees | Brewer, James | Brown, Isaac | Brown, James | Carter, James | Carter, Simeon | Cecil, Joshua | Compton, John | Corder, Elijah | Correl, Martha | Correl, Samuel | Curion, Hugh | Davis, Elizabeth | Davis, John | Day, William | Deenenger, Joseph | Dells, William | Deskins, Mary | Drake, John | Duskins, John | Evins, Robert | Gent, William | George, Jane | George, William | Gere, Philip | Goodwin, Robert | Griffith, William | Harman, Daniel | Harman, Henry | Harrison, Hannah | Harrison, Thomas | Helman, William | Hines, Francis | joshix Hix, Joseph | Jones, Solomon | Justice, John | Kindrick, Patrick | King, Martha | Laird, John | Lockheart, Mary | Lockler, Andrew | Marrs, Henry | Mason, French | Matney, Brooks | Maxwell, James | McIntosh, John | McNeily, James | Moore, David | Oney, Benjamin | Oney, William | Perry, George | Perry, James | Perry, John | Perry, Thomas Sr. | Perry, William Sr. | Renshart, George | Shannon, William | Smith, John | Smith,  . . . more . . .



Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

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Images of Sussex County Virginia Wills and Estates #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Images of Sussex County Virginia Wills and Estates 

Images of Wills and Estates 1754 to 1764

Adams, BenjaminAdkins, HenryAdkins, JohnAtkins, Thomas
Alsobrook, SamuelArmstrong, JosephAtkinson, HenryAvents, John
Avent, ThomasBabbit, ThomasBagley, PeterBair, William
Banke, JamesBarker, HenryBell, BalaamBellemy, Elizabeth
Bellemy, RobertBethemey, ElizabethBennington, RobertBlow, Richard
Booth, GeorgeBridge, JudithBroadrib, JamesBroadrib, Thomas
Bullock, JeremiahBullock, RobertBurrow, ThomasBurrow, William
Carter, RichardChappell, ElizabethClary, ThomasClifton, William
Cook, ReubenCornwell, SamuelCragg, WilliamCrellow, Jeptha
Daney, WilliamDobie, RobertDriggs, WilliamEckles, Edward
Eldridge, ThomasEllis, BenjaminEvans, SarahEzell, Timothy
Farrington, RobertFelts, RichardFreeman, AgnesFreeman, Henry
Freeman, JoelFreeman, NathanGee, JamesGilliam, Jordan
Griffin, EdwardHancock, AnthonyHancock, ClementHancock, John



Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

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Monday, March 25, 2019

General Andrew Lewis of Augusta County Virginia #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

General Andrew Lewis of Augusta County

Andrew Lewis MarkerGeneral Andrew Lewis was born in Ireland about 1720, and came to Virginia with his parents in 1732. John Lewis, the father, was the first white man who fixed his home in the mountains of West Augusta. Andrew Lewis served as a major in the regiment commanded by Washington in the Ohio campaign of 1754 and 1755; also in the French and Indian wars, and was highly regarded by Washington, at whose suggestion he was appointed a brigadier-general in the Continental army. Four of his brothers served in the Revolutionary War, one of them, Colonel Charles Lewis, who was killed at Point Pleasant. The descendants of John Lewis (the father of General Andrew Lewis) are numerous. Some of them have been very distinguished men: John F. Lewis, who died recently, was lieutenant-governor of Virginia, and a senator of the United States. Lunsford L. Lewis, his half-brother, was president of the supreme court of appeals of Virginia for twelve years, retiring from that office a few years ago. Dr. Lewis Wheat is a well-known practising physician of Richmond. Judge John Lewis Cochran, whose mother was a great-granddaughter of John Lewis, father of Gen. Andrew Lewis, and whose great-grandfather, with his wife, Susanna Donnelly, came to America about 1742, was a gallant soldier in the Confederate army, and a distinguished lawyer and judge. James C. Cochran, brother to the foregoing, was a colonel of Confederate militia in the late war. Henry King Cochran served as a surgeon in the Confederate service throughout the war. William Lynn Cochran was a major in the Confederate service, and a lawyer by profession. Howard Peyton Cochran was a captain in the same service. It is claimed that there were one hundred and five of the Lewis family in the service of the Confederate states. Source: Some Irish Settlers in Virginia by Hon. Joseph T. Lawless, Richmond, Virginia



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Friday, March 22, 2019

Images of Stafford Co. VA Wills, Estates #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Stafford County Genealogy, Wills, Marriages, Probate Records

Ferry Farm

Stafford County is located across the Rappahannock River from the City of Fredericksburg. The county seat is Stafford.

Stafford Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Indexes to Probate Records

  • Index to Stafford Wills (1722-1729)

Miscellaneous Wills, Estates

Clement, Edward (LWT) 1733
Elzey, Margaret, deceased (1730) (Image)
Fudd, Michael (Inventory) ca 1733
Grigsby, Charles, LWT (1740) (image)
Grigsby, John, LWT (1728) (image)
Johnson, Booford, estate, inventory (1740) (image) Mauzy, Peter, orphan (image)

Marriages

  • Marriages to 1699

Images of Wills 1699 to 1709

Testators: Alexander, Robert; Ashton, James, estate; Beath, Peter; Benson, Hugh; Bland, James; Brent, George; Brewton, John; Buckner, Philip; Cornwall, Ann; Enno, George; Farlow, Ann; Fitzhugh, William; Harman, Christopher; Harwood, William; Harvey, John; Jenkins, David; King, William ;Littlejohn, Oliver; Mann, James; Martin, Richard ;Matheny, William ;Pickett, Joyce ;Richardson, William ;Taylor, Edward ;Thomson, William ;Vandagesteel, Giles ;Waller, William ;Williams, Anthony ;Withers, John (Captain) ;Wood, William

Images of Wills 1729 to 1748

Testators: Barrow, Abraham; Bayles, John; Boles, Thomas ; Brent, William ; Burras, Mary ;Butler, James ;Cave, William ;Chadwell, John ;Chalmers, John ;Claiborne, Thomas ;Collinsworth, Mary; Cooke, John ;Cosby, George ;Counts, Joseph ;Craford, John ;Croftrodge, Thomas ;Crowley, George ;Denny, James ;Derrick, Mattox ;Duncan, Thomas ;Ellit, Charles ;Fowke, Chandler ; French, Hugh ; Grant, Ann ; Gregg, Lucy ; Grigsby, John ; Grigsby, Thomas ; Higgerson, John ; Hore, Elias ;Howard, John ; Hurst, John ; Jeffrice, Thomas ; Joanes, John ; Jones, Susan ; Keen, Matthew ; Massey, Dodd ; Masters, Thomas ; Mealy, Daniel ; Mees, Mary ; Ponton, Edward ; Powel, Grace ;Scott, Alexander ;Scott, William ;Seaton, James ;Todd, Richard ;Warner, John ;Waugh, John ;Waugh, Joseph ;Wheeler, John ;Wigginton, William ;Withers, James

Images of Wills 1748 to 1763

Testators: Alexander, Philip ;Allan, George ;Anderson, John S. ;Barbee, Thomas ;Baxter, William ;Bosholl, Edward ;Brent, Charles ;Brout, Hannah ;Brown, John ;Buckner, John ;Burge, Edward ;Carter, William ;Chambers, Daniel ;Chapman, Taylor ;Chinn, Rawleigh ;Clifton, Burdit ;Colclough, Rachel ;Conway, Sarah ;Cook, Fravors ;Dade, Cadwallader ;Dade, Townshend ;Dade, Laughton ;Denaugh, Morrice ;Durrcom, Benjamin; Eaves, Thomas ;Edwards,  . . . more . . .



Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

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Monday, March 18, 2019

Lanterns and Candlestickis #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Lanterns and Candlesticks

lanternsCandles made of fireplace ash and myrtle berries supplied the first light for the first colonial homes in the colonies. Myrtle berries were serviceable because the wax to not get too hot to melt. Lanterns came into style during Colonial days and were a prominent feature of the hallway furnishing. Many of these were gilded and many were painted, and their greatest period of popularity was during the first part of the eighteenth century. About 1750 the first glass lamps came into favor. These were not like those of a later period, being very simple in form, and not particularly graceful. 

In 1782 a Frenchman, named Argand, introduced the lamp which still bears his name. This marked the beginning of the lamp era, and while at first these lamps were so high in price that they could only be afforded by the wealthier classes, later they were produced at a more reasonable figure, when they came into general use. . . . more . . .




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Friday, March 15, 2019

Spotsylvania County VA Wills, Estates #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Spotsylvania County Genealogy, Wills, Indentures, Bonds


Walnut Grove Plantation

Spotsylvania County was named for Alexander Spotswood, Lieutenant Governor of Virginia from 1710 to 1722. It was formed from Essex, King and Queen and King William counties in 1720. 

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Wills, Indentures, Bonds 1722 to 1749
  • Wills, Indentures, Bonds 1722 to 1749 (second index)
  • Wills, Indentures, Bonds 1749 to 1760
Images of Wills 1722 to 1749
  • Allen, Thomas
  • Blake, John
  • Ellis, Robert
  • Goodloe, Henry
  • Grayson, Ambrose
  • Hollady, John
  • Leavil, Edward
  • Martin, John
  • Morris, Thomas
  • Samuel, Anthony
  • Taylor, James
Images of Wills 1749 to 1760
  • Allan, John
  • Allen, Elizabeth
  • Barnes, Thomas
  • Battaley, Mary
  • Bullard, Ambrose
  • Carr, William
  • Carter, Joseph
  • Chew, John
  • Childs, Richard
  • Collins, Joseph
  • Collins, Thomas
  • Fox, John
  • Garton, Uriah
  • Gilbert, John
  • Goodloe, Elizabeth
  • Gordon, John
  • Hawkins, Nicholas
  • Herndon, Edward
  • Hunter, William
  • Lynn, William
  • Mathis, Benjamin
  • Matthews, William
  • Minor, John
  • Minor, William
  • Moor, Robert
  • Musick, George
  • . . . more . . .



Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

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Thursday, March 14, 2019

1918 Anderson Six


1918 Anderson Six
Did you know that about the “Anderson Six” automobile? It was advertised and sold in Atlanta during 1918. Do you imagine yourself taking one of the first rides? There are so many interesting stories to learn about our ancestors. Just as we seem to speed quickly along the avenue of life, embracing new ideas and transitioning through new technology, our ancestors also had a grip on the changing fads. 1916 was the last days of Queen Elizabeth’s staunch Victorian Era, and our relatives stepped up for the changes. You don’t really think that your ancestors were boring old trolls who did little to bring out changes, do you? When tracing, it is always a good idea to read the newspapers of their times and see what was happening. Also, 8 Genealogy Websites features genealogy databases in 7 States! Why not check it out?




Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

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Monday, March 11, 2019

Names of Virginia Ancestors --- > Mecklenburg County #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Mecklenburg County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages, Probate Records



Mecklenburg CountyMecklenburg County was organized on March 1, 1765, having split off from Lunenburg County in 1764 as the result of the passage of an Act by the Virginia General Assembly. The result was that Lunenburg was divided in three counties, Lunenburg, Charlotte and Meklenburg. 

Mecklenburg County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers 

Images of Wills 1765 to 1782 
--Note: These old documents were pasted together and there is some blurring -- 

Anderson, Thomas | Arnoll, James | Arnoll, James (2) | Atkinson, John | Baker, Zachariah | Baskerville, George | Bell, William | Bland, Merit | Bott, Ann | Bugg, Jacob | Bugg, Samuel | Burnett, John | Burton, Hutchins | Burton, Nowel | Burwell, Thacker | Cheatham, Leonard | Clarke, Jesse | Cockerham, Philip | Connell, Robert | Cooper, James | Cox, Bowling | Cradle, Briant | Dortch, Noah | Eastland, Thomas | Fargason, Sarah | Fox, Richard | Griffin, Francis | Greenwood, James | Greenwood, Robert | Greer, Joseph | Harris, William | Hatchell, William | Hester, Abraham | Hill, William | Holloway, James | Holmes, Isaac | Holmes, Samuel | Hudson, Charles | Hudson, Christopher | James, Robert | Jefferson, Field | Jeffries, John Jr. | Johnson, Daniel | Ladd, William | Lambert, James | Lawton, John | Lee, Walter | Lewis, Edward | Lucas, William | Luck, Dennis | Mabry, Anne | Maclin, Thomas | Mason, Ann | Mason, Thomas | Murphey, John | Murray, John | Phillips, Martin | Poole, William | Pughe, John | Ragsdale, Benjamin | Reed, John | Roberts, Alexander | Roberts, John | Rudd, Joseph | Ruffin, John | Ruffin, John (2) | Russell, Richard | Shelton, John | Skelton, William | Smith, Preston | Smith, Robert | Speed, John Jr. | Stewart, Martha | Stovall, Thomas | Stroud, John | Tarry, Samuel | Taylor, Thomas Sr. | Taylor, William | Thomason, James | Thompson, Wells | Tillman, Roger | Townsen, William | Tucker, James Tucker, Mat | Walker, Edward | Watson, James | Whitterman, Abraham | Whittmore, Lewis | Wiles, Robert | Willis, Richard | Wilton, Richard | Wright, Reuben | Young, Richard | 

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Index to Wills 1782-1788
  • Index to Wills 1788-1798
  • Index to Deed Book 5, 1777 to 1778
  • Index to Deed Book 6, 1779 to 1786
  • Index to Deed Book 7, 1786 to 1791
  • Index to Deed Book 8, 1792 to 1795
  • Index to Deed Book 9, 1795 to 1797
  • Index to Deed Book 10, 1798 to 1801
Images of Wills 1782-1788 

Testators: Arnold, John | Ballard, John | Blackbourne, Thomas (first page missing from will book) | Bowen, Hicks | Bressie, Elizabeth | Bugg, Jacob | Burwell, Lewis | Camp, John | Carleton, Thomas Christopher, David | Clark, James | Clemonds, Edmund | Collins, Howell | Culbreath, William | Delony, Henry | Duncan, George | Evans, Thomas | Fox, William | Gregory, William | Hill, William | Hix, Amos | Johnson, James | Jones, Robert | Malone, Drury | Malone, Jones | Marable, Matthew | Marshall, John | Maynard, Nicholas | McNeel, John | Munford, R. | Newton, Henry | Ornsbey, Matt | Parish, John | Parish, Peter | Parish, Samuel | Perkins, David | Puryear, John | Puryear, Seymour | Ramsey, Gilbert | Roffe, William | Sandyland, James | Simpson, Richard | Smith, Drury | Speed, John | Stanback, George | Talley, Abraham | Taylor, Goodwyn | Vaughan, William | Walker, Silvanus | Watson, Isaac  ...more...



Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

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Friday, March 8, 2019

Colonists Manufactured the Necessities #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Colonists Manufactured the Necessities

Spinning WheelWithin the Colonial home stood the great and small wheels for wool and flax, the carding-comb and the moulds for making candles of green myrtle berry wax which were not greasy to touch, nor would melt in the hottest weather. During 1698, the typical inventory of a Virginian household included a feather-bed, one sett Kitterminster curtains, and Vallens bedstead, one pair white linen sheets with two do. pillow biers, 2 Rusha-leather chaires, 5 Rush-bottom chaires, a burning glass, a flesk fork, and 6 Alchemy spoones (alchemy being a mixed metal). In addition to these articles, the list includes a brass skimer and 2 pairs of pot-hooks, and, as its crowning glory, one old silver Dram-cup. No doubt the possessor had sat with his boon companions on many a cold night, by the great chimney, plunging the hot poker into the fire nursing the loggerhead 



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Thursday, March 7, 2019

The Colonial Homestead #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

The Colonial Homestead

Carters GroveTowards the end of the 17th century and the struggles of its earliest colonists,the colonial Virginia homestead began to take shape. The house of the planter was substantial and comfortable. The inventory of such a planter mentions, as belonging to the homestead, "a parlor chamber, chamber over said chamber, chamber over the parlor, nursery, old nursery, room over the Ladyes chamber, Ladyes chamber, entry, store, home house quarter, home house, quarter over the creek, Smiths shopp, Barne, kitchen, Dary, chamber over the old Dary, flemings quarter, Robinsons quarter, Whitakers quarter, Black Wallnut Quarter." The house of the rich in the towns boasted a parlor, but its furnishing were simple. A white floor sprinkled with clean white sand, large tables, and heavy high-backed chairs of solid, dark oak decorated a parlor enough for anybody, says the chronicler of Baltimore. William Fitzhugh directs Mistress Sarah Bland in London (1682) to procure him a suit of tapestry hangings for a room twenty feet long, sixteen feet wide, and nine feet high; and half a dozen chairs suitable. The kitchen was typically separated from the dining-room and generally set off in a separate building, due to fires and odors. The dining-room, with its broad buffet, its well-filled cellarette, its silver plate and its quaint old English furniture. Opening out of the dining-room, between it and the parlor, ran the wide hall, with doors at either end, with carved stairway and panelled walls, often hung with family portraits.



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Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Some Notes on Some Interesting Characters in Virginia #virginiapioneersnet

Georgia Pioneers
Tradition has it that Francis Tennille Sr. was a French Hugenot from Picardy, France. His LWT was probated 1779 in Prince William County and named all of his heirs.  One of his sons served in the Second Georgia Continental Battalion during the Revolutionary War.  More information is found in The Austin Collection, Vol. I, by Jeannette Holland Austin and is available to members of Georgia Pioneers.

Mark Thornton of Cumberland Parish in Lunenburg County, Virginia had many descendants in Georgia.  The old man was born in Virginia and died 1809 in Elbert County, Georgia,  leaving a long legacy of accomplished children. More information is found in The Austin Collection, Vol. I, by Jeannette Holland Austin and is available to members of Georgia Pioneers.

Ole Dan Tucker!
There really was an Ole Dan Tucker from Virginia.  He was the son of Robert Tucker and removed to Wilkes County Georgia where he died in 1803.  10 pages of valuable Tucker information is found in The Austin Collection, Vol. I, by Jeannette Holland Austin and is available to members of Georgia Pioneers.

Note:  Virginia Pioneers is a subsidiary of Georgia Pioneers (8 genealogy websites).



Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

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Tuesday, March 5, 2019

French Hostilities in Virginia (1755) #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet


French Hostilities

Port of SupplyAlexandria became the military port of supply. The French hostilities in the region stirred up the Indians until the government of His Majesty became sufficiently exercised to dispatch an officer of the line, Major General Edward Braddock, two warships in which were stowed a fine arsenal of powder, rifles, and cannon, and two regiments of regulars. Word reached Alexandria in February of the arrival of Braddock in Williamsburg and that he and the Governor were in conference. The first result of this conference was a letter to "Mr. George Washington" written on March 2, 1755, and dispatched in the person of General Braddock's aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Robert Orme, requesting the presence of Mr. Washington. A second decision reached in Williamsburg was one that resounded along the Atlantic seaboard - to call a conference of the colonial governors to consider ways and means of waging the coming campaign against the French. Alexandria was chosen as a meeting place and the day set was April 14, 1755. In the meantime, the English warships Sea Horse and Nightingale under command of Admiral Keppel arrived in Alexandria. Two of His Majesty's regiments disembarked from the sea-grimed ships and the Redcoats in formation marched to the northwest of the town led by Colonel Sir Peter Halket and Colonel Dunbar. After the exchange of several letters, Colonel Washington volunteered to go unpaid with General Braddock on the campaign. All at once the town of Alexandria was overrun with governors. From Williamsburg came Dinwiddie; from Maryland, Governor Sharpe; from Massachusetts, Governor Shirley; from New York, Governor De Lancey; and from Pennsylvania, Governor Morris. Neither dress nor ceremony had yet been curtailed by the drabness of Democracy. Each governor arrived with a retinue of secretaries, attendants, and aides; each by coach, decorated in gilded scrolls and colorful arms, drawn by four to six horses; each governor resplendent in wig and powder, silken hose, coats of brocade, velvet or broadcloth, waistcoats of satin or damask, embroidered and braided, shirts of finest linen, betucked and belaced, and attended by servants in livery as colorful as their masters. The town was crowded, taverns full and private houses were put at the disposal of these visitors. Dinners and balls followed the serious councils of the day, which lasted until eleven or twelve o'clock at night. Redcoats were everywhere. The conference over, pomp and pageantry departed, but not before Mr. Washington and General Braddock had disagreed heartily on the fashion of waging warfare. The . . . more . . .



Index to Virginia Wills and Estates

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